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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. controversial right-to-work measures will soon be the law of the land in michigan. republican governor rick snider signed the law despite wide protests at the capitol. the law will make it illegal for a union employee to pay union dues as a condition of their employment. >> let's explain that. just for half a second. then we'll go on. right to work, what does it mean? people ask me, what does it mean? it means unions can force somebody to pay them if they want to get a job in the state of michigan. >> well, what it means is, if you get a job, the union extracts money from your paycheck for the dues for union dues. >> well, yeah. >> automatically. >> automatically. >> you've got no choice. oh, you want to work here? well, you've got to pay us. >> right. >> what if i don't want to pay you? what if i don't want to support the candidates you support? what if they're the antithesis of my values? too bad. and so i've never understood this. >> governor snider says it was the unions who started the fight in the first place. by trying to add collective bargaining rights in the state's constitution.
point, bracing for protests. thousands battling over michigan's right to work. will the governor reconsider the controversial measure. >>> and president obama and house speaker boehner mum on fiscal cliff negotiations. and a sign that a deal could be near. >>> new world order, the economy growing at an enormous rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school
, states of change from kansas to michigan to rhode island. reform is in thes air. find out how some states are bucking the washington trend next. >>> washington may have made a big left turn this year, but in states across the country, another kind of reform is in the air. we begin in mech mitch which this month -- in michigan which was the 24th right to work state. we are back with jason riley and kim strossel and senior economic writer steve moore also joins the panel. steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets of attention. the reforms taking place across the country in a>> lot of states. who are the stars you are looking at? >> i entirely agree with your premise, paul. if you talk about the demise of the republicans on the national level, we are not really seeing that on the state level. 30 republican governors today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and o
at that time. i took a look at it and when i got into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met was modeled -- bob dole and we became good friends even to this day. i asked him what are your plans. and he, without hesitating, said i'm going to be a clerk. after that i'm going to run for the state house, first opening in the commerce. that's where i'm going. i figured that's a good idea. so i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor when the territorial losses became available i ran for that office and when the state could came along i got to congress a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you came here. >> two terms in the house and in the senate. >> and then came here as a member of the house and who did you come here without that time? >> only one member of that time. >> you mentioned senator dole and the fact you were then in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service. he talks about being a friend of -- excuse me, the senator from wyoming, al simpso
and love the outdoors, which is why i especially want to highlight our work to protect lake michigan. beginning with the first bill i introduced in the house, the great lakes water protection act, along with my good friends, i'm proud of our efforts to keep lake michigan clean. this legislation would prohibit waste water pollution from running into the great lakes, but our work to protect the 10th district's most cherished natural resource did not stop there. we focused on in supporting great lakes initiative through authoring and supporting funding amendments and advocating its importance, all to make sure this important program to protect the great lakes is adequately funded. i'm proud we have been able to facilitate the cleanup of waukegan harbor. it has finally started under our watch. so much work in getting this accomplished has happened and i want to thank suesey and jerry and cam for their dedicated service for cleaning up the harbor. getting finally lake county's pathway to the great lakes. i also want to highlight another cause which i have been proud to champion and that i
on the university of michigan law school plan had been upheld into the very thing grutter v. bollinger that have followed the plan closely enough so the court was obliged to uphold it. even one justice, judge garza, who said he hated racial preference isn't about to strike them down said that he had no choice but to uphold this one has been under supreme court precedent. by the way, seven of the 16 justices disagreed and thought you could strike it down under the career precedent. so the case finds its way to the supreme court and it's likely to perhaps become the most important case in history on racial preferences. not so much because there's anything that extraordinary about this case, but the composition of the court has changed his 2003 cases which could be fairly green light to racial preferences, very large racial preferences as long as they're camouflaged beneath the kind of complicated, holistic thing. holistic is like the word or sprinkle holy water over preferences. so here's how it worked at the university of texas. they have an academic index for people outside the top 10%. they hav
tom lamm and step-mom nicole invited all of northeast michigan to launch these chinese lanterns to celebrate what would have been their son's ninth birthday. >> i miss him so much. t's so hard. i just want him back. >> i know. reporter: much of what so many people loved about jadenlamm can be seen in this home video. although he had a rare form of cancer that attacked his central nervous system here he is busting a christmas move right after akeem owe treatment. the kid that kind of spirit. but it was his final words, all his own, that will forever stick with his father. >> he looked at me right in the eye and he said, "i'm never going to get married, daddy." my heart sunk when he said that. i was like why would you say that, buddy? he said god needs me more. >> reporter: god needs me more. his last full sentence. but the beginning of something truly remarkable. a couple days after jaden died tom and nicole were in line to get some coffee when they decided, spur of the moment, to pay for the customer behind them in the drive-through. it was supposed to be just a little symbolic
article that spoke about the wrecking crew. when you wreck the whole state of michigan, and the jobs go down to the south. the south feels very happy about getting all the jobs, but michigan goes through maybe 25 or 30 years of dismantling. that's why we have all the programs trying to save people's skin and life and nourishment. the constitution says to promote the general welfare. host: i apologize. we have to keep moving. this in the new york times -- carl in west virginia, republican line. you are on the washington journal. good morning. caller: good morning. i watched your show every morning and sometimes i get a big laugh out of you guys. if you read every article with something negative about the republican party. you have straw men set up. first you blamed george bush for four more years. now you are blaming grover norquist. he is the bogeyman of the democrats now. in order for a republican to get back in power, we are going to have to infiltrate the news media and we are going to have to infiltrate the educational system, because our kids are absolutely being indoctrinated in o
're just doing it the way the university of michigan law school did it, and so we're okay. there are a number of distinctions between the cases, though, that we think will help the, you know, the now-more skeptical about racial preferences court strike down tease preferences. they wouldn't have to overrule the grutter case to do so, because the grutter case justice o'connor articulated some principles that were supposed to limit the size and duration of racial preferences to avoid abuses, but she department really enforce them. -- she didn't really enforce them. but they remain on the books. you're supposed to pursue race-neutral alternatives before you resort to race. well, texas did. they have this 10% plan. they get a lot of racial diversity and other diversity from the 10% plan. did they really need to use individual racial preferences on top of it? that's one argument in her favor. another argument is the court has said no racial balancing, meaning you cannot try to mirror in your state's university's composition the racial proportions of the statewide population. tha
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
: that from inside "the washington post." ed is on the phone from michigan. good morning to you. caller: good morning, c-span. i have listened to some of what the democrats have said. the way i look at it -- if the rich, if they are worried about 3% raise, one of the middle class and the poor or about the same raise? is it your patriotic duty to pay taxes? if the poor are concerned about their money going down, a lot of energy regulations are coming into effect that will cost electric costs to co-op which will affect the poor just as badly as it is the rich? host: mark from ohio, good morning. caller: all the power was taken from the epa and given to the nra. there is no fiscal cliff. there was another so-called fiscal cliff in 2008. give money to the billionaires and banks. when eisenhower took office, he gutted the military. taxes were 9% on corporations. 10 trillion dollars being horded. the problem lies and propaganda. 90% of all our information from the tv and the radio comes out of the state of texas and new york city. that is wall street. there is an economy based on military bases and
to express the fact that last night i came in to do a special order on the situation happening in michigan where a surprise attack, a sneak attack by the right wingers resulted in the passage of legislation, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one ti
for christmas. fedex issued a service advisory over the weekend it expects delivery issues in iowa, michigan, wisconsin and nebraska. fedex has contingency plans in place. no service advisories on ups or postal service websites. a big part of this is shippers have had a huge increase in volume this holiday season, and that's because of a huge surge in online shopping. so, you know, all of these online sites are reporting some of their biggest single days ever, and so that means the shipping places are also feeling the effects. ups made 28 million deliveries last thursday. fedex moved 19 million packages on its busiest day. it's a busy time in the shipping business. suzanne. >> all right. have a great holiday. >> you, too. >>> the raging debate is should we put armed guards in every american school? in some countries it happens already. we go live to israel to see how they keep their kids safe inle school. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's g
. >> clayton: welcome back. quick headlines. the smell of marijuana coming from one michigan home is so strong it's making people physically sick. neighbors reportedly filed a lawsuit saying the pot smell violates local laws against offensive odors. >>> and another ipad already? reportedly prepping a thinner, lighter, fifth generation ipad that shares some of its designs with the smaller ipad mini. so it would be as thin as this ipad mini. it's rumored to be out in march. we will see. they just launched the ipad 4 in the fall. >> rick: buy a new one! >> gretchen: never ending. >> rick: it never ends. >> gretchen: oh, my gosh. if you're looking to make a fresh start for 2013, our next guest has come up with a physical and spiritual workout that nourishes both body and soul and includes an easy 28-day plan to make it all possible. >> rick: donna richardson joiner is the author of "witness to fitness" and a member of the president's council on fitness, sports and nutrition. welcome, and thank you for get up this morning. you were on this council for both president bush and president obama, so you
, which arsome are doin. i did want to yield initially to the gentleman from michigan. >> i thank my good friend. i commend you for holding this hearing today. in my entire career, i have fought to ensure the affordable quality health care decisions are in need. the upholding of the law brought to fruition a dream that was had by my father. these are two fundamental provisions. they will achieve our goal of providing affordable health care of high-quality to every american. though the exchange and small businesses will be able to easily shop for health plans that best suits their needs, and the medicaid expansion will provide millions of uninsured americans with access to our nations' --'s -- a nation's healthcare. it is critical we get it right. i hope this hearing will do so. >> the gentleman yield back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from georgia for the purpose of an opening statement. >> i think you. but the distinguished member did not say is -- what the distinguished member did not say is the obama bill results in increased cost of health care and does not bring it down. i find
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)